An Analysis of Renew 2000 Season 3 - Week 6

By Members of Our Lady's Warriors
Commentary Copyright 2000 by Our Lady's Warriors. All Rights Reserved.

Note: Watch words and phrases are underlined; commentary is presented following Renew 2000 text.

Unity in the Human Family in the New Millennium

Environment for the Gathering

Place three candles in the center of the table. Light one candle with each invocation of the opening prayer.

Opening Prayer

Begin with a few minutes of quiet reflection.

Pray together

God, our Father, you are creator of all. Each human being was created in your image and likeness. You created each with a soul and reason.  Help this commonality be the beginnings of a true unity among all people.

Jesus, the Christ, you are the one through whom all things were and are created. You came down and took on flesh that you might lead us to the love of the Father. Help us reach out to all people in that love, and according to your will.

Holy Spirit, you are the giver of every gift. You have inspired and guided the Church through these many centuries. Be with us as we begin to examine how we might better respect the commonality of all humanity.  Strengthen us to be instruments as God reaches out to all.

Living Our Faith Sharing

Share how you lived out your faith during the previous week, focusing particularly on the commitment you made from the last session.

Focus of the Session

We are called to human unity, a unity of the human family. It is time to end the scandal of hostile relationships that has been so much a part of our lives -- the scandal of intolerance, hate and violence.

SHARING OUR EXPERIENCE

Take a few minutes to read the following silently or aloud.

The call to human unity-recognizing that which all of us have in common-is a call to which we are becoming ever more aware. Last week, we focused on ecumenical relationships which exist among Christian congregations. This week, our focus expands to a consideration of interfaith relationships with those who do not believe in Jesus Christ.

In the Judeo-Christian tradition, we believe that God is the creator of all things. In Genesis 1 and 2, we find the stories of creation. These stories speak of the reality that God has indeed created all human beings in his likeness and image.  It is upon this truth that our recognition of human dignity and unity rests.

As Catholic Christians, we look not only to Scripture for direction, but also to the continued guidance of the Holy Spirit within the Church. From 1963-1965, the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council met and wrote numerous documents guiding the Church and the faithful. The Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World speaks about human unity:

...everyone should look upon his neighbor (without any exception) as another self, bearing in mind above all his life and the means necessary for living it in a dignified way lest he follow the example of the rich man who ignored Lazarus, the poor man (Gaudiurn et Spes, #27).
This dignity and respect for all people is spoken of specifically with regard to our dialogue with unbelievers:

Modern man increasingly acknowledges the dignity and worth of the human person, in view of the general progress of culture and society.... Thus dialogue, insofar as it relies on mutual relationships between the participants, demands that each party acknowledge the dignity and worth of the other person (Humanae Personae Dignitatem, August 28, 1968, #1).

The dignity and worth of each person is further stressed in the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

Created in the image of the one God and equally endowed with rational souls, all men have the same nature and the same origin (#1934).

The Catechism, in further explanation, quotes from Pius XII:

An error, "today abundantly widespread, is disregard for the law of human solidarity and charity, dictated and imposed both by our common origin and by the equality in rational nature of all men..." (#1939, Summi pontificatus, October 20, 1939, #423ff.).

The words-"everyone should look upon his neighbor (without any exception) as another self," "dignity and worth of the human person," "mutual relationships," "same nature and the same origin," "our common origin and...equality in rational nature of all..."-speak strongly about the unity that exists between and among all human beings.

SMALL COMMUNITY SHARING

Take a few moments of silence to reflect on the following questions. Then share your reflections.

LISTENING TO THE WORD

Read Psalm 117 and John 17:1-11.

Pause for a few minutes of quiet reflection, allowing the Word of God to enter deeply into you.

REFLECTION

Take a few minutes to read the following reflection silently or aloud.

In coming to an understanding of the regard that we are to have for the entire human family, we see in the teaching of the Church the call for respect for and dialogue with believers of faiths other than Christian. John Paul II, in his Apostolic Letter Tertio Millennio Adveniente, calls

for inter-religious dialogue, in accordance with the specific guidelines set down by the Second Vatican Council in its Declaration Nostra Aetate on the relation ship of the Church to non-Christian religions. In this dialogue the Jews and the Muslims ought to have a pre-eminent place. God grant that as a confirmation of these intentions it may also be possible to hold joint meetings in places of significance for the great monotheistic religions (#53).

This dialogue may take place at the official level of faith leadership, as well as in our own personal relationships. Despite very real differences that must be resolved, certain common beliefs can help to open up such dialogue. The following are cited as examples. [note the several pagan philosophies] The challenge of working toward unity in the human family is great. Much remains to be done through prayer, through service projects and in various dialogues--ecumenical, interfaith and those with nonbelievers. Respectful exchanges are needed at the official level of Church and faith leadership as well as informally within our own personal relationships.

Being well informed and strong in our own belief in how Christ is working in and through the body of our Catholic Church is the best starting point for our efforts. Despite differences that have existed for centuries, we remain hopeful. Along with Pope John Paul II, we enter the new millennium optimistically because we believe wholeheartedly in Jesus and in the certainty "that nothing will be impossible with God" (Lk 1:37).

SMALL COMMUNITY SHARING

Take a few moments of silence to reflect on the following questions.  Then share your reflections.

LIVING OUR FAITH

No sharing would be complete without a commitment to putting our faith into practice. As you reflected on God's Word and shared insights with others in your small community, you experienced the grace of God. What is the specific action God is inviting you to take to change your own life or to respond to someone else's need? Choose a specific, concrete action that flows from your sharing. The examples below are given only as ideas to generate a creative response .

Prayerfully reflect upon what ways you could contribute to and what would foster peace and trust among people and among nations in the 21st century.

Imagine what a world of peaceful harmony would be like! The following suggestions may provide some help in making a real response to the call of evangelization, ecumenism and interfaith relationships.

  1. Decide to gather with those of other Christian congregations for faith sharing in Seasons IV and V of RENEW 2000. (Your parish may choose to connect with other Christian congregations to foster these ecumenical small community gatherings.)
  2. Make a genuine effort to speak to people regardless of their faith stance.  Ask them about their beliefs and hopes, and express yours. Offer information about your Christian faith, its meaning and significance in your life.
  3. Read and learn about other religious faiths. Offer these books or articles to others.
  4. Consider the subtle prejudices that exist in your family. Gently discuss them with family members in hopes of putting aside all such prejudices.
  5. Consider an ecumenical approach to a social justice project that will help to address a need in your area. Invite others to work with you.
  6. Participate in an Advent Ecumenical Service with other Christian congregations. (Check with your Core Community Coordinator.)
  7. Make a real effort to understand the basis of ancient hatreds between nations and people. Pray that peace and trust be restored in these areas of extreme tension and hatred.
  8. Determine that you will not be racist or sexist or nationalistic and that you will be respectful of people who are different from yourself.
  9. Think of another concrete action that you would like to take.

If you wish to do so, share your commitment with others in your small community.

Between Now and Season IV

Meet as a small community, and use the booklet from the IMPACT Series entitled At Home in the Catholic Church in order to learn more about or to better appreciate your Catholic faith (available from RENEW Book Services at RENEW International, 1232 George St., Plainfield, NI 07062-1717).

CLOSING PRAYER

The scriptures from various religions offer many similar messages. To each scripture quote, all respond: "Lord, make us people of love and peace." [note the several pagan prayers]

Reader 1: Recompense evil, conquer it with good (Islam).
All: Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 2: "Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good" (Rom 12:21, Christianity).
All:  Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 3: With kindness conquer rage, with goodness malice; with generosity defeat all meanness; with straight truth defeat lies and deceit (Hinduism).
All: Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 4: A soft answer turns away wrath, but harsh word stirs up anger (Judaism).
All: Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 5: Conquer your foe by force, and you increase his anger. Conquer by love and you will reap no after-sorrow (Buddhism).
All:  Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 6: Love is sure to be victorious even in battle, and firmly to maintain its ground. Heaven will save its possessor, by his love protecting him (Taoism).
All: Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 7: Shall I tell you what acts are better than fasting, charity, and prayers? Making peace between enemies are such acts (Islam).
All: Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 8: The noble-minded dedicate themselves to the promotion of peace and the happiness of others-even those who injure them (Hinduism).
All: Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 9:  How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of those who bring good tidings, who publish peace (Judaism).
All: Lord, make us people of love and peace.
Reader 10: "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God" (Mt 5:9, Christianity).
All:  Jesus, our Savior, our Christ, you taught us that all are invited to be one family, one people of God. As we approach the beginning of the third millennium since your birth, make us people of peace and love. Let us be your witnesses, people of your Gospel. Soften our hearts and open us to all people. Let the world once again know we are Christians by our love. Amen.

Close by singing "Let There Be Peace on Earth" by Sy Miller and Jill Jackson or another appropriate song.

Reminder

This is the last week of Season III of RENEW 2000.  The next Season will begin the week before Lent.  It is suggested that, if it is possible, the small communities become ecumenical. If your community would like to continue meeting between Seasons, contact your pastor or parish staff or RENEW International (1232 George St., Plainfield, NJ 07062-1717; tel. #: 1-908-769-5400; fax #: 1-908-769-5660) for additional resources.


Our Lady's Warriors Commentary:

Excerpts from Renew 2000 text are presented in italics.

Pluralism Sneaks in via the "Tolerance" Principle

Be with us as we begin to examine how we might better respect the commonality of all humanity.

It is time to end the scandal of hostile relationships that has been so much a part of our lives -- the scandal of intolerance, hate and violence.

Determine that you will not be racist or sexist or nationalistic and that you will be respectful of people who are different from yourself.

RENEW 2000 proposes the words of "intolerance" and "respect," (another buzzword for "tolerance") as commonly used in "dissenter-speak." The Catholic Church has always taught that we are to respect one another. That does not imply to deny evangelization of God's Truth or to accept the faulty ideas of other faiths. Most importantly, the only intolerance the Church has is for error. As guardian and teacher of God's Truth, the Church cannot tolerate erroneous beliefs to be incorporated into her since it already has the Truths as revealed by God Himself. Vatican II Lumen Gentium explains:

#8. "The one mediator, Christ, established and ever sustains here on earth his holy Church, the community of faith, hope and charity, as a visible organization through which he communicates truth and grace to all men.  ...  This is the sole Church of Christ which in the Creed we profess to be one, holy, catholic and apostolic, which our Savior, after his resurrection, entrusted to Peter's pastoral care (Jn. 21:17), commissioning him and the other apostles to extend and rule it (cf. Matt. 28:18, etc.), and which he raised up for all ages as "the pillar and mainstay of the truth" (1 Tim. 3:15). This Church, constituted and organized as a society in the present world, subsists in the Catholic Church, which is governed by the successor of Peter and by the bishops in communion with him. ..."

What is certainly true is that Catholics cannot force anyone to the Catholic Faith. Since Faith is a gift from God, only God can give it to a person who assents via their own free will. Even God does not force His Faith on anyone, such is the powerful gift of free will that He gave each and every person. It is the Church's - and every Catholic's - duty and privilege to evangelize the whole world with God's Truth, and not to accept the false ideas in the world. Pope Paul VI said in On Evangelization in the Modern World (Evangelii Nuntiandi):

#80: "... It would certainly be an error to impose something on the consciences of our brethren. But to propose to their consciences the truth of the Gospel and salvation in Jesus Christ, with complete clarity and with a total respect for the free options which it presents—"without coercion, or dishonorable or unworthy pressure" [Declaration on Religious Liberty Dignitatis Humanae, 4: AAS 58 (1966), p. 933.]—far from being an attack on religious liberty is fully to respect that liberty, which is offered the choice of a way that even non-believers consider noble and uplifting. Is it then a crime against others' freedom to proclaim with joy a Good News which one has come to know through the Lord's mercy? [Cf. Ibid., 9-14: Loc. Cit., pp. 935-940.] And why should only falsehood and error, debasement and pornography have the right to be put before people and often unfortunately imposed on them by the destructive propaganda of the mass media, by the tolerance of legislation, the timidity of the good and the impudence of the wicked? The respectful presentation of Christ and His kingdom is more than the evangelizer's right; it is his duty. It is likewise the right of his fellow men to receive from him the proclamation of the Good News of salvation. God can accomplish this salvation in whomsoever He wishes by ways which He alone knows. [Decree on the Church's Missionary Activity Ad Gentes, 7: AAS 58 (1966), p. 955.] And yet, if His Son came, it was precisely in order to reveal to us, by His word and by His life, the ordinary paths of salvation. And He has commanded us to transmit this revelation to others with His own authority. It would be useful if every Christian and every evangelizer were to pray about the following thought: men can gain salvation also in other ways, by God's mercy, even though we do not preach the Gospel to them; but as for us, can we gain salvation if through negligence or fear or shame—what St. Paul called "blushing for the Gospel" [Cf. Rom 1:16.] —or as a result of false ideas we fail to preach it? For that would be to betray the call of God, who wishes the seed to bear fruit through the voice of the ministers of the Gospel; and it will depend on us whether this grows into trees and produces its full fruit. ..."

Treading Dangerously

Read and learn about other religious faiths. Offer these books or articles to others.

In the past, the Catholic Church has restricted the reading of various books that were a danger to the Faith. Today, the restriction is not kept in a specific list as in the past, but the danger still remains. Instead, the Magisterium issues warnings. Two examples of such warnings are about Liberation Theology and Fr. Anthony de Mello. The latter illustrates where even a priest, who studied Buddhist and Taoist spirituality, sank into such pagan errors and was finally condemned by the Magisterium. It can be dangerous to study other faith's belief systems since there is a risk of losing the true Catholic Faith. For the average Catholic, RENEW 2000 proposes very bad advice indeed. Instead, study further the Catholic Faith which is so rich that a lifetime on earth could hardly provide enough time to scratch the surface. See the Saints section for a small sampling of the marvelous works available.

Vatican II teaches that only those well grounded in Catholic teaching and prepared for serious theological study should undertake ecumenical discussions. By all means should every Catholic evangelize by their very way of proper Catholic living! RENEW 2000 fails to mention these facts. In Unitatis Redintegratio we are taught:

#9: We must get to know the outlook of our separated brethren. To achieve this purpose, study is of necessity required, and this must be pursued with a sense of realism and good will. Catholics, who already have a proper grounding, need to acquire a more adequate understanding of the respective doctrines of our separated brethren, their history, their spiritual and liturgical life, their religious psychology and general background. Most valuable for this purpose are meetings of the two sides-especially for discussion of theological problems-where each can treat with the other on an equal footing-provided that those who take part in them are truly competent and have the approval of the bishops. From such dialogue will emerge still more clearly what the situation of the Catholic Church really is. In this way too the outlook of our separated brethren will be better understood, and our own belief more aptly explained.

#10: It is most important that future shepherds and priests should have mastered a theology that has been carefully worked out in this way and not polemically, especially with regard to those aspects which concern the relations of separated brethren with the Catholic Church. This importance is the greater because the instruction and spiritual formation of the faithful and of religious depends so largely on the formation which their priests have received.

#11: Moreover, in ecumenical dialogue, Catholic theologians standing fast by the teaching of the Church and investigating the divine mysteries with the separated brethren must proceed with love for the truth, with charity, and with humility. When comparing doctrines with one another, they should remember that in Catholic doctrine there exists a "hierarchy" of truths, since they vary in their relation to the fundamental Christian faith. Thus the way will be opened by which through fraternal rivalry all will be stirred to a deeper understanding and a clearer presentation of the unfathomable riches of Christ.

More Non-Catholic Worship

Participate in an Advent Ecumenical Service with other Christian congregations.

This same issue has been covered in Season III week 5. What most Catholics don't know is that attendance at another faith's service does not substitute for the Sunday Mass obligation. Of course, missing Mass is a sin, and a mortal (serious) sin if done with consent of the will. Just as importantly, active participation in another faith's service implicitly states that one believes in such a faith, which is a form of apostasy against the Catholic Faith. Obviously this is a sinful practice discouraged by the Church. One typical allowance is attending the wedding ceremony of those of a different faith, whereby the Catholic person is celebrating the marriage rather than attending another faith service. 

In Vatican II's Unitatis Redintegratio we are warned that such inter-faith prayer or worship is to be decided by local episcopal authority, and not by RENEW 2000.

#8: Yet worship in common (communicatio in sacris) is not to be considered as a means to be used indiscriminately for the restoration of Christian unity. There are two main principles governing the practice of such common worship: first, the bearing witness to the unity of the Church, and second, the sharing in the means of grace. Witness to the unity of the Church very generally forbids common worship to Christians, but the grace to be had from it sometimes commends this practice. The course to be adopted, with due regard to all the circumstances of time, place, and persons, is to be decided by local episcopal authority, unless otherwise provided for by the Bishops' Conference according to its statutes, or by the Holy See.

Dissenter-Speak Labels

Determine that you will not be racist or sexist or nationalistic and that you will be respectful of people who are different from yourself.

The words-"everyone should look upon his neighbor (without any exception) as another self," "dignity and worth of the human person," "mutual relationships," "same nature and the same origin," "our common origin and...equality in rational nature of all..."-speak strongly about the unity that exists between and among all human beings.

Again RENEW 2000 uses various terms common in "dissenter-speak." Let's take the key words one at a time.

Racist: the Catholic Church has always taught that we are to treat all races charitably. In fact, in Jesus time on earth, His call to the Gentiles - those pagans of other races - was a scandal to the Pharisees. Only the true Catholic in Apostolic times accepted those of other Gentile races while the un-converted Jews continued the practice of exclusion. The Church has accepted all peoples from every nation throughout its history. The Catechism of the Catholic Church explains:

#1935 The equality of men rests essentially on their dignity as persons and the rights that flow from it: Every form of social or cultural discrimination in fundamental personal rights on the grounds of sex, race, color, social conditions, language, or religion must be curbed and  eradicated as incompatible with God's design. [Gaudium et Spes 29 2]

Nationalistic: God has instituted the nations, which are all part of God's adopted family. What is RENEW 2000 hinting at? A one world government run by a United Nations organization which condones unborn baby killing, sterilization and the like? Jesus said to evangelize all nations, not to eliminate the concept of them. In fact, it is a Catholic's duty to love and serve their nation (i.e. country). Our real earthly unity is found in the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church of Jesus Christ. The Catechism of the Catholic Church explains:

#2239: It is the duty of citizens to contribute along with the civil authorities to the good of society in a spirit of truth, justice, solidarity, and freedom. The love and service of one's country follow from the duty of gratitude and belong to the order of charity. Submission to legitimate authorities and service of the common good require citizens to fulfill their roles in the life of the political community.

#56: After the unity of the human race was shattered by sin God at once sought to save humanity part by part. The covenant with Noah after the flood gives expression to the principle of the divine economy toward the "nations," in other words, toward men grouped "in their lands, each with [its] own language, by their families, in their nations." [Gen 10:5; cf. 9:9-10, 16; 10:20-31]

#57: This state of division into many nations, each entrusted by divine providence to the guardianship of angels, is at once cosmic, social, and religious. It is intended to limit the pride of fallen humanity, [Cf. Acts 17:26-27; Deut 4: 19; Deut (LXX) 32: 8]  united only in its perverse ambition to forge its own unity as at Babel. [Cf. Wis 10:5; Gen 11:4-6.] But, because of sin, both polytheism and the idolatry of the nation and of its rulers constantly threaten this provisional economy with the perversion of paganism. [Cf. Rom 1:18-25] 

#59: In order to gather together scattered humanity God calls Abram from his country, his kindred, and his father's house, [Gen 12:1] and makes him Abraham, that is, "the father of a multitude of nations." "In you all the nations of the earth shall be blessed." [Gen 17:5; 12:3 (LXX); cf. Gal 3:8.]

#60: The people descended from Abraham would be the trustees of the promise made to the patriarchs, the chosen people, called to prepare for that day when God would gather all his children into the unity of the Church. [Cf. Rom 11:28; Jn 11:52; 10:16] They would be the root onto which the Gentiles would be grafted, once they came to believe. [Cf. Rom 11:17-18, 24] 

#849: The missionary mandate. "Having been divinely sent to the nations that she might be 'the universal sacrament of salvation,' the Church, in obedience to the command of her founder and because it is demanded by her own essential universality, strives to preach the Gospel to all men": [Vatican II Ad Gentes 1; cf. Mt 16:15] "Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and Lo, I am with you always, until the close of the age." [Mt 28:19-20]

Sexist and (in)equality: This is the big radical feminist labeling tactic. For modernist dissenters, the label of sexist is most frequently heaped on those who refuse to accept the error of "women priests." The "inequality" label is used against those who follow the Church's teachings that men and women are of equal dignity but have different roles and responsibilities. Radical feminists deny that there is a complementary masculine and feminine (other than obvious physical differences).

#372 Man and woman were made "for each other" - not that God left them half-made and incomplete: he created them to be a communion of persons, in which each can be "helpmate" to the other, for they are equal as persons ("bone of my bones . . .") and complementary as masculine and feminine. In marriage God unites them in such a way that, by forming "one flesh," [Gen 2:24] they can transmit human life: "Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth." [Gen 1:28] By transmitting human life to their descendants, man and woman as spouses and parents cooperate in a unique way in the Creator's work. [Cf. Gaudium et Spes 50 1]

Pagan Prayers and Philosophies Again

[many pagan philosophies in the Reflection section]

[many pagan prayers in the Closing Prayer section]

RENEW 2000 jumps back into pagan prayer. At least it is not outright Wicca as was included in the Leaders manual, so there is some improvement. It is quite clear that Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Muslim faiths largely contradict Catholic Truths or omit various Catholic Truth's, such as simple basics that Jesus Christ is really God, the Second Person of the Most Blessed Trinity. Why not stick to Catholic prayers which express the Truth? As the Church has always taught, as explained in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, that prayer and belief must be unified. Catholics are definitely not to accept pagan beliefs through their prayers.

#1124 " The Church's faith precedes the faith of the believer who is invited to adhere to it. When the Church celebrates the sacraments, she confesses the faith received from the apostles - whence the ancient saying: lex orandi, lex credendi (or: legem credendi lex statuat supplicandi, according to Prosper of Aquitaine [5th cent.]).[Ep. 8.] The law of prayer is the law of faith: the Church believes as she prays. Liturgy is a constitutive element of the holy and living Tradition. [Cf. Dei Verbum # 8]"

In addition, the Old Testament in the Bible is replete with examples whereby the Israelites were absolutely forbidden to pray pagan prayers or even marry pagan spouses. Time and time again the Israelites ignored this command and fell prey to being conquered as punishment, such as the Babylonian captivity for 70 years. Why does RENEW 2000 repeat this same error today?

Some may claim that these particular pagan prayers are innocuous. Rather than say pagan prayers, why not pray Catholic prayers so that the pagan believers can see the God's revealed Truth through the Catholic Faith? Isn't it true that the Catholic Church is called to evangelize and bring all people into God's One Holy and Apostolic Faith? Isn't that true ecumenism? That's what Vatican II teaches. Finally, in Unitatis Redintegratio we are warned that such inter-faith prayer or worship is to be decided by local episcopal authority, and not by RENEW 2000.

#8: Yet worship in common (communicatio in sacris) is not to be considered as a means to be used indiscriminately for the restoration of Christian unity. There are two main principles governing the practice of such common worship: first, the bearing witness to the unity of the Church, and second, the sharing in the means of grace. Witness to the unity of the Church very generally forbids common worship to Christians, but the grace to be had from it sometimes commends this practice. The course to be adopted, with due regard to all the circumstances of time, place, and persons, is to be decided by local episcopal authority, unless otherwise provided for by the Bishops' Conference according to its statutes, or by the Holy See.


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